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6 Ways to Empower Your Employees to Be More Productive

Posted by Sylvia Giltner on Sun, Jun, 03, 2018 @ 16:06 PM

empowered_employees-resized-600-3

Being a manager or a team leader can be difficult to process. While you are in charge of a group of people and have the place of authority, you also have a duty to your employees. In most cases, productivity and employee motivation is a direct reflection of their manager’s mood, experience and overall character.

This can make it difficult for young, inexperienced managers to effectively motivate employees to be engaged and  productive. Luckily, employee motivation isn’t anything new in the corporate world, so let’s take a look at some actionable and effective tips that can help you raise productivity and morale across the board.

  1. It’s not about the money

It’s true that we work for money and the ability to sustain ourselves in a modern capitalist society. However, most employees are unmotivated and lack productivity for very different reasons.

Low salary is very rarely the reason for a lack of productivity, which means you should steer clear of “bribing” employees with bonuses. Instead, communicate your displeasure with their overall (not individual) productivity.

Don’t point fingers at anyone (even if you might know who the real detractors are) and focus on the bigger picture instead. Emphasize you are also an employee like themselves and you are there for them if they need you. This will create a good starting point for your relationship and a foundation upon which productivity can be restored.

  1. Happiness versus Motivation

Don’t misinterpret employee happiness with motivation and productivity. For example, if you give your employees a box of chocolate each, they will be happier – but not more productive.

Productivity is often associated with professional development, working environment dissatisfaction, coworker misunderstandings, too much overtime, etc. It’swise to openly discuss these topics with your employees in order to determine what the real issue is.

Remember you are also under the microscope of your own manager or CEO. If the employees aren’t productive, the results will reflect that, after which you will have to explain what is going on. Make sure to have the right answers for your own boss and start communicating with your coworkers as soon as possible.

  1. Be a role-model

As we’ve mentioned before, managers and team leaders are often seen as role-models. Your coworkers, employees and office staff will most likely have aspirations for professional development. This means that they will pay close attention to the way you walk, talk and act with those inferior to you (professionally speaking).

Veronica Wright, CEO of ResumesCentre says: “The better the managers are at their own work, the better their employees will be for it”. Make sure to arm everyone with relevant company information, take your position and job description seriously, as well as smile to everyone. Sometimes all it takes is to look in the mirror and ask yourself what “you” are doing wrong instead of looking for a culprit on the office floor.

  1. Voicing concerns

It’s quite common for employees to keep their mouths shut when they have something to say – the prospect of being punished is too much to handle. This means that there is often a lot left unsaid and coworker relations tend to tense and buckle under the pressure.

People that don’t talk to each other will often work poorly together, not to mention the fact that important projects rest on their shoulders. Try implementing a feedback-oriented working environment in your office starting with yourself. There is no better way to break the ice than to simply start from your own experiences, thoughts and fears.

Employees that share common issues, goals and clear the air through professional communication are far more likely to be productive. While it may seem silly for grownup people to share thoughts around the table, clearing the air like this can completely transform your office’s workflow.

  1. Level the playfield

Most office conflicts stem from misunderstandings between employees and management. Managers often forget where they started their career while employees constantly claim their managers doesn’t understand them.

This catch-22 is quite common in the corporate world and is a root cause of poor productivity, low retention rates and a lack of morale. Managers that want to boost their employees’ productivity should work to leveling the playing field between management and employees. Remember you are all employees of the same company – the difference is only in your job description.

If you claim that you are “better” than your staff, it will likely end in a disaster. Pull up a chair, ask your employees how they feel today and ask them if they need help. Chances are that their eyes will widen with disbelief at first, which will lead to a much healthier professional relationship between you.

  1. Showcase and reward

Lastly, it’s important to share in your successes and take responsibility for your failures. The best and most beloved managers know when to reward someone and when to take the blame. Pointing fingers when going gets tough and claiming the rewards when it strikes gold will quickly erode your employees’ morale and productivity.

Be the example that your employees can really look up to and try to reward their productivity in small but significant ways. Even an “employee of the week” system with a collective clap from everyone can drastically brighten the mood.

James Scott, CEO of EssaySupply notes: “Do what you can to make sure that your employees feel important and that they matter to the company. This is the best way to increase productivity and company loyalty across the board. It will not only make your results shine but also put you in good graces with your own manager for the good work you have done.”

 

Long-form empowerment (Conclusion)

Employee empowerment only works if you take definitive action – a long-term commitment with a constant risk of failure. However, being on good terms with the people you work with is worth fighting for.

You will not only bring good results to your company but also create friendships with the people you work with. Being casually professional can work just as being strict and to-the-letter. Make sure to strike a good balance and be there for your employees when they need you.

Tags: empowerment, employee empowerment, employee engagement, loyal employees

Integrity as a Value

Posted by Tom Smith on Wed, May, 16, 2018 @ 09:05 AM

 

As you know, I begin with the vision, mission, values and strategic positioning when I begin working with any organization. If the management team is not aligned with all four, it's impossible to develop a cohesive integrated marketing communications plan and deliver a consistent message to your employees and your prospects.

 

The most important value to me is integrity - doing what you say you will do when you say you will do it. If you're unable to do what you say you will do when you say you will do it, why should anyone trust you about anything else - your products, your services, your guarantee, your word?

 

As the leader of a business organization, you set the tone for the organization. You are the role model for everyone in the organization who need to be aligned in order for your organization to achieve its goals. Your organization will not achieve its goals unless everyone is aligned with the same vision, mission, and values and is communicating the same strategic positioning. You need your employees to be just as accountable as you when it comes to doing what you say you will do, when you say you will do it.

 

If your do not do what they say they will do when thy say they will do it, they detract from the organization’s integrated approach with regards to vision, mission, values, and strategic positioning. Consistency builds trust. Inconsistency results in confusion and distrust. If some of your employees are doing their jobs with integrity and others are not, your customers and prospects will be confused - as will your brand.

 

There are four important steps for your employees to do their jobs with integrity.

  • Teach employees what you mean by integrity

If your employees don’t understand the concept of integrity, they cannot reap its benefits. So your first job is to make them aware of integrity. This can be done in a number of different ways. It is easiest to teach integrity through stories, animated movies, films, slide shows and concrete examples. You should take the time to display these resources at the workplace

Here is a great story to show employees the importance of living with integrity and transparency. Integrity is not just about doing what's right even when others are not. Living with integrity serves as a role model for colleagues, suppliers, channel partners, and your competition. Here is another story which depicts strong, creative leadership. Stories are a great way to deliver a compelling, and memorable message

 

  • Compensate employees fairly

Integrity starts at the top and scare the daylights out of a lot of c-level executives with whom I have worked. If you are not paying employees fairly, your employees will not be with you for long and certainly will not be engaged. They will be angry that you are taking advantage of them and their situation and constantly looking for a new job rather that focused on achieving the objectives of the organization. It's critical to you pay similar compensation to employees who are in similar roles. It’s obvious if an organization’s compensation discriminate with regards to age, sex, or race, the organization, and its management is not living with integrity. Integrity is not just about telling the trust and being transparent, it is also doing what is right and treating everyone fairly so they can grow and flourish together. Even if you don’t pay fairly, still.

Paying people fairly does not mean you cannot make distinctions between older workers with more seniority or experience or those with management potential. If an employee deserves more than others, especially for reasons that may not be entirely obvious to all members of the team, ensure they are fairly compensated. Everything can not be translated into a tangible ROI. Some people are bringing skills and value to the organization that cannot be quantified.

 

  • Know your competitors

Every organization has competitors. Ensure your employees know who your competitors are and what makes you "different and better." This is part of the message they should be delivering when asked who they work for and what do you do, as evidenced by a custodian at NASA

Employees are more likely to be engaged, empowered, and live with integrity when they know what makes the company they work for "different and better" than their competition. Employees will end up holding each other accountable for doing what they say they will do. I wonder what would have happened has Enron management and employees embraced integrity?

 

  • Engage with employees

Employees model the words and actions of their leaders. That's why it's important for management to share their thoughts and be open to having difficult discussions.  Employees want to know how they are doing. While it's better to focus on leveraging the positives, it's necessary to be honest with employees about where they are not lving up to expectations, pulling their weight, or doing what they say they will do. As such, regular one-on-one is vital to building their integrity.

This goes both ways. In a transparent organization, employees should be encouraged to talk to management about any issues they see out of alignment of living with integrity, without reprisal. This empowers employees and leads to greater innovation and progress.

 

Tags: integrity chain, employee engagement, employee empowerment

Broken Hiring Policies in Technology

Posted by Tom Smith on Tue, May, 15, 2018 @ 11:05 AM

This was originally published on the site for my work but was removed over concerns over starting a "flame war." It's a conversation we need to have so I'm sharing on my personal blog. Please keep it civil. Thank you.

 

The Congressional Black Caucus recently visited Apple, PayPal, Twitter, Square and Airbnb to assess whether Silicon Valley was making any progress in becoming more racially diverse. It wasn’t long before the lawmakers discovered that while some of these tech giants had made “small progress,” most had become less diverse over time.

Thanks to Jori Ford, Senior Director of Content, G2 Crowd, a review website for business software and services, for sharing her thoughts with me about inclusion and diversity in the technology industry. Jori, who identifies as black, Korean and LGBT, believes the chief problem is that the tech industry’s hiring practices are broken.

Rather than hiring racially diverse candidates for their skills and experience, tech companies are on a mission to fill empty quotas. But, at G2 Crowd, this isn’t the case, which is one of the key reasons Jori was attracted to the company.

How have broken recruiting and hiring processes led to tokenism (age, race, gender) in tech?

When you think about standard recruiting policies, you see recruiters and HR checking to see if candidates match skills needed. As a candidate you apply, interview, learn whether you’re qualified, and then you’re either selected or you are not.

When you are part of an underrepresented group you already know there’s not going to be a lot of people like you in the process – see Google, PayPal, Uber, and many others. You think you’re a statistic with 90 percent fitting the ideal profile — heavily male, white or Indian.

Unrepresented groups as a whole less than 1% are African American women.

As I ask questions about diversity in interviews, responses have been jarring. Many organizations do not have their own definition of diversity. They’re giving it little to no thought. Transparency in statistics and day-to-day work environments are key.

At G2Crowd, everyone has to take a test and all you have to do was pass. This balances the playing field for everyone.

When you’re not allowed to see who is working at the organization looking for diversity it makes for a walled system. At G2Crowd, is was interviewing in a fully glassed room that allowed me to experience all of the culture around me. The interview is a time when the company is conveying its business to a candidate and the candidate is seeing and evaluating the culture they will be included in. Inclusivity is key to recruiting.

If you don’t see anyone like yourself it makes you wonder if you’ll be accepted by the members of the organization. It’s all about perspective and we each have our own perspective which makes it hard to see outside. It’s hard for me to see where I fit in. Am I welcomed in the space? To get past perspective, there has to be someone you can see, someone you can connect with as an individual.

What’s the solution?

Make sure there is an active pipeline of diverse candidates. Organizations are having difficulty building the pipeline. They need to build the people they want to come and work for them. A lot of people look to incubators, but incubators lack underrepresented groups as well.

I believe it starts as K through 5 STEM programming. The decision doesn’t start in high schools and college. Paige & Paxton elementary STEM curriculum get kids started early before they’re even thinking about college.

Many colleges are funded by larger organizations who say they want diversity but then the lack of diversity is again prevalent.

What are the benefits of having a diverse organization besides being the right thing to do?

Organizations with more diversity have more challenging thoughts and different perspectives that result in more interesting and disruptive strategies to affect the world. Organizations need that thinking in-house before they begin building solutions. Diversity brings different perspectives to the table. You end up with business strategies you wouldn’t have come up with otherwise.

Who’s doing a good job?

G2Crowd is doing well. We have diverse age groups, neutralization of demographic factors through testing that show candidates they are valued for their mind. The interview process is transparent, not judgmental. You interview with a diverse, cross-functional panel of people.

What do minority developers need to keep in mind?

Don’t let statistics deter you. "Token" doesn’t mean what you think. Even though numbers show a sliding scale, people are necessary to make the change. Show your talent and make it known – step into the opportunity. Programmers are taught logic and statistics; however, the math isn’t always the reality, you can shape and mold the reality.

What should organizations that are serious about diversity and inclusion do?

Look at Project Include, they help organizations, and in particular management teams, learn where to start.

Inclusion is not an initiative. Organizations must humanize and see the people beyond the actual brand. It all comes down to people. Let people see the people for who they are and how they look or you won’t have diversity.

It’s about inclusion and people wanting to be someplace where they’re included and their voice is heard.

Tags: transparency, total radical transparency, employee empowerment, employee engagement, innovation

One Thing EVERY Company Can Do To Improve Customer Experience

Posted by Tom Smith on Mon, Nov, 17, 2014 @ 12:11 PM

free wifi > customer experience

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I just attended the Internet Summit (#isum14) at the Raleigh Convention Center.

 

I heard plenty of speakers sharing statistics about the growth of the internet, the growth of mobile and how to use the Internet to improve customer experience.

 

Ironically, internet access at the Raleigh Convention Center became limited as the attendance reached 2,000 people.

 

The one thing every business can do to improve the customer experience is to provide an always on, high-speed internet connection.

 

We're all using mobile devices, or laptops, to do business, research, stay in touch and stay informed.

 

By providing always-on, high-speed internet access, you're making your customers', and employees', lives simpler and easier.

 

Making customers' lives simpler and easier gives you a better chance of having a "customer for life."

 

Making your employees' lives simpler and easier gives you more empowered and engaged employees that are more likely to provide your customers an outstanding customer experience.

 

Conferences will have happier attendees.

 

Hotels will have happier guests.

 

Airlines/airports will have passengers that are able to get work done, or stay connected with their loved ones, even if their flight is delayed.

 

Restaurants and coffee shops will provide a valuable service to guests whether they're there on business or pleasure.

 

Businesses will ensure their clients, customers or guests are able to say connected while they're in their offices or stores.

 

How would high-speed internet access differentiate your business from your competition?

 

How would making your customers' lives simpler and easier change their impression of, and willingness to continuing doing business with, you?

 

Want to Accelerate Sales? Download the Free e-book  "Customer Bonding Programs:  How to Get, and Keep,Customers for Life"

Tags: customers for life, customer experience, customer satisfaction, empower employees, customer retention, satisfied customers, customer centric, employee engagement, employee empowerment, customer service

5 Obstacles to Employee Engagement and 5 Steps to Overcome Them

Posted by Tom Smith on Fri, Oct, 10, 2014 @ 10:10 AM

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Thanks to research provided by Bruce Temkin and the Temkin Group.

 

Only 28% of employees are highly engaged with executives being the most highly engaged and those being employed at small companies being the most highly engaged employees.

 

The top five obstacles to improving employee engagement:

 

  1. Lack of a clear employee engagement strategy.

  2. Inconsistent buy-in among middle managers who may, themselves, not be engaged.

  3. No clear owner leading the effort.

  4. Limited funding to support employee engagement efforts.

  5. Senior management has not identified employee engagement as a priority.

 

Given the focus on sales and monthly/quarterly earnings, it's not a big surprise that neither employees, or customer, engagement is a high priority for many companies.

 

They do not see the correlation between engaged employees and engaged customers and the long-term benefits satisfied customers can provide the firm relative to new prospects.

 

The five "I's" of employee engagement:

 

  1. Inform -- provide employees with the information they need to understand what is expected of them.

  2. Inspire -- connect employees to the company's vision and mission.

  3. Interact -- support employees with training, coaching and feedback. Understand what drives your employees. Hint, it will vary by individual.

  4. Involve -- take action with employees to improve processes and solve problems. Your customer-facing employees have a good idea of where your products and services are, and are not, meeting your customers' needs and expectations.

  5. Incent -- deploy appropriate systems to measure, reward and reinforce desired behaviors. Do you really want to reduce the time a CSR spends on the phone with a customer if spending more time will result in greater customer satisfaction?

Is your firm taking any steps to enhance employee engagement?

 

Click Here To Schedule a 30-Minute Consultation  to Discuss Marketing or Sales Issues 

Tags: vision, mission, employee engagement, employee empowerment, corporate culture

Empower and Engage Employees to Share Content

Posted by Tom Smith on Mon, Aug, 04, 2014 @ 10:08 AM

empower employees to share content

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great webinar from Natanya Anderson (@natanyap) from Whole Foods, Denise Holt (@deniseholt1) and Nicole Alvino (@nalvino) of Social Chorus entitled, "From Employee to Advocate: Mobile Your Team to Share Your Brand Content."

 

According to the Edelman Trust Barometer, 52% of consumers trust an "average employee." Content shared by employees receives eight times the engagement of content on brand channels.

 

At Whole Foods, employees are empowered and encouraged to share the brand's story online.

 

Whole Foods actively recruits passionate team members to voluntarily share their offline stories online.

 

This has resulted in:

  • 300 active team members sharing.

  • 10,000+ social shares.

  • $35,000 in advocate market value.

 

According to Natanya, the five keys to successs are:

 

  1. Align the program to business objectives. Their metrics are engagement, awareness, employee engagement, thought leadership and morale.

  2. Start with a social media policy. This includes: mitigate risk, ensure FTC compliance, avoid marketing jargon, make sure participation is voluntary, provide resources and best practices for employees.

  3. Get leadership buy-in. Have a brand champion at every location. The leaders will drive program awareness and adoption.

  4. Create a content and engagement plan. Provide a variety of content and opportunities to share. Monitor and optimize content performance. Identify a method for ongoing communication.

  5. Identify social team members and encourage more participation. Start with the most active team members already involved with social media. Identify team members and leaders to champion the program in each store.
For companies with less engaged and empowered employees, Denise suggests an employee-brand relationship program that addresses the employees' emotional journey:
  1. Hesitation -- overcome fear of saying the wrong thing through training and role plays.

  2. Empowerment -- give employees a voice and examples of what you consider to be appropriate and relevant content to share.

  3. Stake in the company's success -- help employees see where they are making a difference sharing content and engaging with consumers in social media channels.

  4. Loyalty -- engaged employees have a desire to contribute to the company's success.

  5. Satisfaction -- examples of how employees' efforts have built, or improved, the business.
Are you and your company empowering your employees to share content and help disseminate your company's message?
Empower Employees to Get Insights Download the Free e-book "How To Get Insights From Analytics" to Accelerate Sales

Tags: trust, authenticity, content, employee engagement, social media, employee empowerment

Does Your Corporate Culture Drive Repeat Business or just Sales?

Posted by Tom Smith on Thu, Jun, 12, 2014 @ 10:06 AM

corporate culture affects customer experience

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Motors knew about their faulty transmissions 11 years before they did anything about them.

 

Target knew they had data security issues six months before they were hacked.

 

The largest privately-held software company in the world has significant customer satisfaction issues that result in them refunding their clients millions for years.

 

A friend who works for a local health insurance company tells me I should be grateful I didn't get a job with her employer.

 

Another friend of a firm with whom I was consulting told me to be glad I didn't get their director of marketing position -- "just look at what the employees are saying on Glassdoor."

 

And yet another friend lost his job heading up the VOC (voice of the customer) program for "the world's leading provider of IT training and business training" because they're more interested in sales than customer satisfaction.

 

Has the success of Amazon, Zappos, Chipotle, Costco and Southwest Airlines, NPS leaders, not taught anyone anything?

 

Hey Mr. and Ms. C-Level executive, your employees will only treat your customers as well as you treat your employees.

 

If all you care about, and reward, are sales, don't expect your employees to be concerned with anything other than making sales.

 

If you don't show concern for your customer satisfaction levels, your NPS or the number of referrals you're getting, don't expect your employees to be.

 

If you, and your employees, don't care about customer satisfaction, do you really expect your customers to continue doing business with you?

 

When I talk to senior managers about vision, mission and values, their eyes glaze over. It's clear they either don't understand, or don't value, what I'm talking about.

 

Well, your employees and your customers do. Perhaps c-level dissonance with vision, mission and values are what's diving the pathetic employee engagement and customer satisfaction levels?

 

Employees today want to work for a company who has a mission that more than "maximizing shareholder value."

 

Customers want to support businesses who care about them, their needs, their wants.

 

Be transparent. Do what's right by customers -- protect their data, if your product has a defect fix it.

 

Make the customers' life easier, simplify their life, show them you care -- you'll have a customer for life because your competitors aren't doing it.

 

Amazon will ask if if you're sure you want to buy the same book you bought three months ago before they go ahead and register your purchase of the same book.

 

Banks, cell phone and internet providers, NPS laggards, all know enough about their customers' usage habits to suggest a plan that provides more value for your money.

 

Unfortunately, none of these companies, that I'm aware of, will let you know they've got a better offer for you until you call to cancel, or reduce, your service.

 

Customers do business with people, and companies, they know, like and trust.

 

What are you doing to earn your customers' trust?

 

What are you doing to engage and empower your employees to provide an outstanding customer experience?

 

Or, do you just care about sales?

 

Want to Accelerate Sales? Download the Free e-book  "Customer Bonding Programs:  How to Get, and Keep,Customers for Life" 

Tags: VoC, voice of the customer, net promoter score, vision, mission, values, employee engagement, employee empowerment, customer service

5 Questions Leaders Can Answer to Empower and Engage Employees

Posted by Tom Smith on Tue, Jun, 10, 2014 @ 10:06 AM

employee empowerment, employee engagement

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A lot has been written about the high levels of disengaged employees and the reason employees leave their employer.

 

Do you have an open and on-going dialog with your employees?

 

You need to if for no other reason than your employees will only treat your customers as well as you, and your managers, treat your employees.

 

Wondering what to talk to your employees about?

 

How about sitting down and sharing with them your answers to these five questions:

 

  1. Which of your life experiences can serve as an inspiration to your employees?


  2. What can you share that makes you vulnerable and relatable?


  3. What mistakes have you made that helped you become a better leader?


  4. What can you share that personally connects you to your company's vision?


  5. What have you learned from your employees that have helped you in your day-to-day activities? 

 

The more transparent and open you are with employees, the more trust you will earn. 

 

Having a face-to-face conversation with your employees, one-on-one or in small groups, lets them know you are human and you care about them as people.

 

The more they know this, the more they'll be engaged and want to do a good job for you, your company and the customers they serve.

 

As Theodore Roosevelt said, "No one cares how much you know, until they know how much you care."

 

Getting to know your employees as individuals will let them know you care and will likely make them more empowered and more engaged.

 

Force yourself, and encourage your managers, to get to know the folks they're managing.

 

The number one reason an employee leaves a company is a poor relationship with their manager.

 

As the economy improves, you want to improve your relationships with your best employees to ensure they stay on your team rather than going to a competitor.

Empower Employees to Get Insights Download the Free e-book "How To Get Insights From Analytics" to Accelerate Sales 

Tags: trust, empower employees, employee engagement, empowered employees, employee empowerment, face to face communications

7 Keys to Organizational Empathy to Enhance Customer Experience (#cx)

Posted by Tom Smith on Fri, May, 09, 2014 @ 10:05 AM

organizational empathy improves the customer experience

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great presentation by Bruce Temkin during the VoC (voice of the customer) Fusion Conference (#vocfusion).

 

Bruce shared his path for organizations to achieve organizational empathy.

 

Organizational empathy is a commitment by companies that they will work towards developing a deeper understanding of their customers’ needs, and they will use this knowledge to serve those needs better.

 

Bruce has even started an amplify empathy movement (#amplifyempathy) to encourage individuals to help build stronger empathy for their customers within their organizations.

 

People are wired to help other people -- be it their colleagues, prospects or customers.

 

Empathy is the ability to imagine ourselves in another's place and understand their feelings, desires and needs.

 

People behave differently whether they are an employee or a customer.

 

Engaged employees have: high interest, high knowledge, silos of focused messaging, politics and egos.

 

Customers have needs, desires, interest in your product or service and some level of knowledge.

 

Silos are not going away because they're an effective way to organize and manage knowledge.

 

Customer experiences happen between the silos. How can we enhance communication between the silos to enhance the customer experience?

 

Bruce proposes seven keys to unlock organizational empathy:

 

  1. Talk about customer emotions. How do they feel about their experience? Angry, adoring or something in between.

  2. Look at the journey, not just interactions.  Ask what happened right before and what they will do right after to understand the context of the request and to determine where you can personalize the experience and add value. USAA probes when someone calls to change their address. If the soldier is being deployed, it might save them money to put their automobile insurance on hold while they are away.

  3. Talk about customers as people. Customers are not statistics. Know that you can't be all things to all people but you can treat people as individuals and help identify the correct solution for their need.

  4. Interact regularly with target customers. Employees that are highly or moderately engaged are more empathetic. Employees want to be part of something bigger than their day-to-day job. Do your employees know your company's mission? Is it bigger than just generating more revenue?

  5. Provide a strong sense of purpose. This sense of purpose provides four intrinsic rewards: 1) meanfulness; 2) choice - don't script everything, empower people to make decisions on their own; 3) competence - build skills and training; 4) progress - growth and learning.

  6. Empower random acts of kindness.  Ritz empowers employees to spend up to $2,000 on a guest to enhance their experience. Disney encourages each of their employees to spend five minutes creating a special moment for a guest.

  7. Personal happiness enhances empathy. Find reasons to be thankful. Hire happy people and keep them happy. Find ways for you to be happy.

 

More organizational empathy will result in more happy customers.

 

More happy customers will buy more, more frequently and provide greater lifetime value for the firm.

 

Empower Employees to Get Insights Download the Free e-book "How To Get Insights From Analytics" to Accelerate Sales 

Tags: customer experience, customer satisfaction, employee engagement, employee empowerment, lifetime customer value, empathy

Talk with Your Employees to Engage and Empower Them

Posted by Tom Smith on Thu, May, 08, 2014 @ 10:05 AM

engaged and empowered employees will grow your business

 

 

 

 

 

 

The five key drivers of employee engagement are:

  1. A warm working environment

  2. Ability to help others

  3. Developing friendships

  4. A boss that develops their potential

  5. Developing new skills and responsibilities 
Note, none of these are related to more money.
They are related to making an emotional connection with the people that work for and work with.
Having a conversation with you employees will help make that emotional connection.
You'll get to know their needs, desires and aspirations. And if you're committed to helping them meet their needs, desires and aspirations, you'll have an engaged and empowered employee who wants to help make you and your business successful.
I heard a great story about a call center, a line of work notorious for turnover, who had tremendously loyal and engaged employees who provided outstanding customer experiences.
As part of the interview process, the hiring team determined what an employee wanted to ensure they'd be happy in the position for two to five years.
In one case, a single mom wanted a steady job that would give her the flexibility to support her two kids while going to school to get a degree in psychology.
Once the team learned what the potential employee wanted, they researched the courses the employee would need to get the degree at a local community college and got back to her in a couple of days with an offer that included how she would get her degree.
An employer that goes to those lengths for their employees earns a lot of trust and loyalty, as well as an engaged and empowered workforce that differentiates them from their competition.
Engaged employees:
  1. Stay longer, thereby reducing your training and recruitment expenses

  2. Promote the company to friends, family, prospects and customers
     
  3. Demonstrate increased productivity and quality to less engaged coworkers

  4. Are passionate about providing an outstanding customer experience
The three components of an engaged employee are: the head, the heart and the actions:
  • Head = "I believe." I believe the products and services we produce and sell are the best for our customers.

  • Heart = "I'm inspired." I'm fully aware of the vision, mission, values and strategic positioning of the firm and am excited about the direction of the company.

  • Actions = "I will give discretionary effort." I will recommend our products and services to my firends and family, as well as to our prospects and customers. I will do my best to ensure our customers have an outstanding customer experience.

If you're interested in having an engaged and empowered group of employees, talk with them to find out if they're the right fit for your organization.
If they are, learn what they need to be engaged and empowered.
 
Engaged and empowered employees will grow your business by producing better quality products and services and providing more outstanding customer experiences.
This will result in more loyal customers who will spend more and be worth more, over time.
Empower Employees to Get Insights Download the Free e-book "How To Get Insights From Analytics" to Accelerate Sales

Tags: trust, vision, mission, values, emotional connection, employee engagement, employee empowerment