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4 Tenets of Conscious Capitalism

Posted by Tom Smith on Mon, Jan, 05, 2015 @ 10:01 AM

I just read an interesting interview with Kip Tindell, chairman and CEO of The Container Store and a leader of a growing movement called Conscious Capitalism which teaches business leaders to create shared value by making their companies more successful and competitive while advancing the quality of life for the community and the world.

 

The concept of Conscious Capitalism is consistent with a personal philosophy that I shared with a colleague several years ago -- there's plenty of business for everyone that plays nice and plays by the rules.

 

Sadly, we see a lot of individuals who do neither making a lot of money at the expense of others (i.e., executives at Enron, Tyco, WorldCom, Bank of America, et.al.).

 

Conscious Capitalism puts purpose before profits with the belief that balancing the needs of all of a business' stakeholders -- employees, customers, suppliers, community and shareholders -- is the right thing to do and will result in a more profitable and successful business.

 

Four businesses that exemplify Conscious Capitalism are The Container Store, Whole Foods, Zappos and Southwest Airlines.  

 

All four of these companies put employees first and focus on providing an outstanding customer experience -- both of which are integral to the second tenet since employees and customers are both key stakeholders.

  1. Higher purpose.  Also known as the "mission" -- the purpose of the company beyond making a profit or dominating a market position.  A compelling sense of purpose can create a high level of engagement by the stakeholders and generate tremendous organizational energy.
     
  2. Stakeholder orientation.  Explicitly managed for the good of all stakeholders including customers, employees, investors, suppliers and the larger communities in which the business participates.  By creating value for all stakeholders, the whole system advances.  Zappos is making a dramatic contribution to their community by significantly revitalizing a "dead" downtown Las Vegas.
     
  3. Conscious leadership.  Management is driven by service to the firm's higher purpose and focuses on delivering value to the stakeholders. Conscious leaders adopt a holistic worldview that goes well beyond the limitations of traditional business.  Enterprises, and individuals, are part of a complex, interdependent and evolving system with multiple constituencies.
     
  4. Conscious culture as captured by the acronym TACTILE.  T = trust.  A = authenticity.  C = caring.  T = transparency.  I = integrity.  L = learning.  E = empowerment.  A conscious culture is very tangible to stakeholders and outside observers.

The result of this is empowered employees who we know work harder, are more creative, care more and are responsible for driving greater customer experiences.

Another result is long-term trusted relationships with suppliers, consistent with The Integrity Chain, which is more profitable for both parties.

Would your company benefit by following the four tenets of Conscious Capitalism?

What is your higher purpose?

If you're interested, you can sign up for the Conscious Capitalism newsletter here.

 

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Tags: conscious capitalism, empowerment, transparency, integrity, mission

16 Ways to Build Trust with Customers and Prospects

Posted by Tom Smith on Wed, Dec, 03, 2014 @ 12:12 PM

trust resized 600

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to the Edelman Trust Barometer who has been performing this study for the past 14 years. This year's research includes 33,000 respondents from 27 countries.

 

The findings are the fundamentals we all need to follow to build trust with customers and prospects:

 

  1. Listen to customer needs and feedback and have a closed loop process to address them. I suggest using a three-question Net Promoter Score (NPS) survey to begin the dialogue.

  2. Treat your employees well. Your employees will only treat your customers as well as you treat your employees.

  3. Place customers ahead of profits. Do what's right for the customer and everything else will take care of itself. Do what's wrong by the customer and you'll be called out on social media and will fail faster.

  4. Communicate with integrity and honesty. Be open and transparent. Again, if you're not, you'll be called out on social media and your business will be toast.

  5. Have ethical business practices. Do unto others . . .

  6. Take responsible action to address issues or concerns in a timely manner. If you can't resolve the issue by the end of the day, let the customer know the status of the resolution and when they can expect their issue to be resolved.

  7. Have transparent and open business practices. Perhaps cell phone and cable companies would have higher NPS scores if they had this philosophy?

  8. Offer high quality products and services. Give people products and service of value. Ask customers if they feel like they're receiving good value from your products or services.

  9. Be innovative. Offer new products, services or ideas. Anything you can do to make life easier and simpler for customers will be rewarded with more business and mentions in social media.

  10. Work to protect and improve the environment. It's telling that all of the BP stations in my area of North Carolina are being rebranded.

  11. Address society's needs in every day business. This goes back to having a vision and mission that's more than about just making money.

  12. Create programs that positively impact the local community. Give back to the community that supports your business and livelihood.

  13. Partner with NGO's, government and third parties to address society needs. We're beginning to see more public-private partnerships to address the country's crumbling infrastructure.

  14. Have highly-regarded and widely-admired top leadership. Your leaders are your brand outside your company. Are they on brand? Are they active on social media and within the industry expressing their point-of- view? Leaders don't hide, they're out front engaging customers as well as critics.

  15. Rank high on a global list of companies. Decide what you want to be known for and be the best you can be at it.

  16. Deliver consistent financial returns to investors. Companies that build trust with customers and have high NPS scores tend to perform better financially than those who don't. It's simply good business to do what's right by your customers and prospects.

To me, these 16 ways to build trust boils down to my personal mantra: "Do what you say you will do, when you say you will do it?"

 

Which of the 16 things is your company doing well?

 

Where can you improve?

 

If you don't know, ask your customers. 

Tags: transparency, trust, be responsive, integrity, customer centric, do what you say you'll do when you say you'

3 Keys to Lead Generation

Posted by Tom Smith on Mon, Nov, 03, 2014 @ 10:11 AM

3 keys to lead generation

 

 

 

 

 

 

Communicate. Communicate. Communicate.

 

There are three keys communication that will help you generate more leads:

 

  1. Provide information of value
     
  2. Be consistent

  3. Be relevant

 

Providing information of value, not selling, builds awareness and trust of your products, services and company, as well as establishing you as a trusted-advisor on the subject about which you are sharing.

 

Start by answering all of your customers' and prospects' questions openly and in a transparent manner. Doing so will help establish you and your firm as someone who want to help solve a problem rather than just sell something.

 

What problem do you solve? How do you do it? How much does it cost? What are the benefits? What are the downsides?

 

By answering someone's question before they even ask you the question, you are saving them time and making their life easier. If you save someone time, or make their life easier, they're more likely to be a loyal, and long-term, customer.

 

Consistency is key. Consistency builds trust. Inconsistency confuses people which leads to distrust.

 

Ensure all of your communications, across all channels, are consistent -- the same information, the same tone.

 

I strive to be genuinely helpful by sharing information I think will be of value to business owners and marketing professionals.

 

Be relevant. This can be difficult if you're inwardly focused. It's much easier if you are customer-centric.

 

Find out what your customers and prospects have questions about and answer those questions.

 

Ask your sales force and your customer service reps what the objections, issues and questions they hear most frequently.

 

Map the customer journey identifying the questions received and the information needed at each step of the journey. Once you've done this, don't forget to share your journey maps and questions with customers for validation. 

 

By providing information of value that's consistent and relevant, you will drive greater awareness, traffic and leads while establishing you, and your brand, as trustworthy.

 

What questions can I answer for you about sharing information of value?

 

Click Here to Download Your Lead Generation eBook

 

Tags: transparency, trust, be real, information of value, alignment, consistent messaging, be relevant

Drive Adoption and Engagement with Employee Advocacy

Posted by Tom Smith on Fri, Oct, 03, 2014 @ 10:10 AM

employee advocates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks to Susan Emerick (@sfemerick), CEO and founder of Brands Rising, Lori Grey (@lsgrey) of Deloitte and Alex Cramer (@cramer1000) of Dynamic Signal for an informative presentation on empowering and engaging employees to help drive customer adoption and engagement.

 

I've written before about how loyal employees = loyal customers.

 

More and more brands are empowering their employees to support the goals of the brand by using content and employee-owned social media expertise and contacts.

 

When you consider the number of social media contacts and followers your brand has versus that of all of your employees, you have a tremendous opportunity to increase the reach of your message by asking your employees to share your messages and information of value with their social networks as well as your customers and prospects.

 

Besides, employees generate more trust than companies:

  • 84% of people trust recommendations from people they know while only 15% trust recommendations from brands (Gartner).

  • 70% of customer brand perception is determined by experiences with people (Market Leader).

  • Leads developed through employee social marketing convert 7X more than other leads (IBM).

  • People like to do business with those they know, like and trust. Employees humanize your brand. 

 

There are several steps to building an employee advocacy program:

  1. Determine the "best fit" candidates.

  2. Provide training, remove doubt.

  3. Personalize. 
     
  4. Reward and recognize.

Determining "best fit" candidates depends on the vision, mission and values of your organization and finding the people who are already in alignment and equipped to share their knowledge and expertise.
Characteristics of "best fit" candidates are:
  1. Already have a strong social media footprint.

  2. Comfortable collaborating online.

  3. Find value in creating and nurturing relationships via social media.

  4. Demonstrate a long-term commitment to sustained engagement.

  5. Open to coaching, guidance and learning from data. 

 

There are several steps you can take to provide training and remove doubt given that people and companies have concerns about employees posting on social media on behalf of the company:

  1. Provide education and training on social media best practices, as well as any restrictions the company may have based on industry requirements.

  2. Have peer mentoring or teammates you can bounce questions off of.

  3. Provide an online source of content that's preapproved -- prewritten, preapproved share text that employees can customize. This ensures consistent messaging and eliminates the need for employees to develop information of value from scratch.

 

Personalize the content you are asking your employees to share:

  1. Employees will be much more comfortable with, and likely to share, content that's relevant to them personally and professionally. They'll also be more comfortable personalizing for the channel or the audience.

  2. Use sign-up forms to create groups to know which topics or industries interest which people.

  3. Use groups to tag and distribute content.  

 

Reward and recognize those employees that are helping spread the company message via social media:

  1. Professional recognition is having contributors recognized by their peers and executive management about what they are doing, as well as their accomplishments.

  2. External recognition is showcasing individuals as industry thought-leaders giving them an opportunity to represent, or speak on behalf of, the company at industry functions. 

 

Do you have an employee advocacy program in place?

 

How are your employees' activities benefitting the company?

 

Click Here To Schedule a 30-Minute Consultation  to Discuss Marketing or Sales Issues

Tags: transparency, empower employees, connecting emotionally with customers, customer engagement, employee engagement, loyal employees

5 Steps to Omnichannel Marketing and Customer Service

Posted by Tom Smith on Fri, Sep, 05, 2014 @ 10:09 AM

omnichannel marketing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great article by Perry Simpson in a recent edition of Direct Marketing News entitled "5 Ways to Evolve Your Marketing to Omnichannel."

 

 

I wanted to share the five steps and comment on them as well as share several points made in the article:

  • According to the Rightnow Customer Experience Impact Report, 89% of customers say they have stiopped doing business with a company after one poor customer experience.

  • Omnichannel marketing, and customer service, is the fundamental practice of providing a seamless marketing experience across multiple channels.

  • Marketers need to ask themselves, what can we do to simplify the lives of our customers and make them more loyal.
The more you can do to save your customers time and simplify their lives, the more loyalty you will earn.
We all know the frustration of having to repeat our information to different service reps on the same call or reenter data when we are dealing with online forms or chat.
What are you doing to make the lives of your customers and clients easier?
Here are the five steps:
  1. Think holistically. Think about the entire customer experience. Map it. Identify the gaps in service that exist between the silos of your organization. It's becoming more common for customers to complete a single transaction acrosss multiple channels. If you don't have a 360-degree view of the customer, you will not be able to provide a seamless, simple, transaction.

  2. Build collaboration. Silos exist in all organizations. It's important to collaborate across silos to identify what a seamless customer experience is and to make the commitment to everyone in the organization having a single view of the customer.

    While silos can still exist within the organization, data silos on customers cannot if you are committed to providing a seamless, omnichannel experience.

    You have to ensure all of the segments of the organizations can work together and share information for the good of the customer.

  3. Map the experience. Know how your customers went about becoming your customers. Sales and marketing need to sit in a room together and map the customer's buying journey and then share their findings with a few customers to ensure they haven't missed any steps or made incorrect assumptions about what the customers actually did and what they were thinking at the time.

    Do this by having one-on-one interviews with the customer about their buying process. They're more likely to provide personal insights in a one-on-one conversation versus a focus group.

    Ultimately, marketers need to define what experience they want their customers to have and then move them through the marketing and sales process in a way that's makes it easy for the customer to buy the product or service you are selling with confidence and trust.

  4. Explore low-tech solutions. Marketing automation and analytics have made omnichannel marketing more attainable. However, don't forget to engage your customers in a dialog about what works for them and what they consider to be an acceptable, as well as, an exceptional, customer experience.

    Providing an exceptional omnichannel customer experience is the best way to turn satisfied customers into "raving fans" that share their experience with friends, family, colleagues as well as all their social media "followers."
     
  5. Embrace transparency. Be real, be realiable, be responsive. Companies that provide an inconsistent customer experience acrosss channels confuse their prospects and customers.

    Consistency breeds trust. Inconsistency breeds distrust and causes your to lose leads, prospects and customers as evidenced by the opening statistic from Rightnow. 
 
What steps can you, and your firm, take to provide a seamless omnichannel experience for your customers?
The more you are able to do now, the more it will benefit your firm, and differentiate your firm from competitors, now.
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Tags: transparency, trust, be reliable, be responsive, be real, consistent messaging, omnichannel marketing and customer service

Top 25 Companies for Culture and Values in 2014

Posted by Tom Smith on Wed, Aug, 27, 2014 @ 10:08 AM

Align along vision, mission and values
Thanks to Glassdoor for sharing their findings.

 

 

 

If you've read any of my previous posts, you know how strongly I feel about companies empowering and engaging their employees.

 

It all starts with having a powerful vision, mission and values and a management team that is in total alignment so they're consistent in what they tell those they manage, as well as how they manage.

 

Where trust is an issue, there is no trust.

 

Values lead to alignment and empowers team members to overcome any disagreement.

 

Clearly the following firms do not have trust as an issue.

Top Companies for Culture & Values 2014

Want to work for a company where employees are satisfied with the culture and values? Glassdoor has announced its report of the Top 25 Companies for Culture & Values, based on workplace insights shared by the people who know companies best — the employees. The following companies stand out for high culture & values ratings and insightful reviews.

Top 25

Ratings Scale: 3.51–4.0 = “Satisfied” 4.01–5.0 = “Very Satisfied”  
Is your management team in alignment with regards to the vision, mission and values of your firm?

Don't assume they are.

 

I worked for a firm and suggested they let me do one-on-one interviews with the management team to ensure everyone was in alignment.

 

The president, to whom I reported, said that wouldn't be necessary since they had just completed a strategic planning session.

 

Sadly, I quickly saw how out of alignment, not only the management team, but the entire staff was and I was powerless to do anything about it.

 

While the company was doing alright, it could have been performing at a significantlly higher level if employees were on one team rather than several different, frequently competing, teams.

 

Ask the members of your management team, independently, about the vision, mission, values and strategic positioning of the firm and see how much the answers vary.

 

I assure you the insights you get will be invaluable to the firm, and may save your job.

 

Need More Insights From Your Analytics? Download the Free e-book

Tags: transparency, trust, alignment, vision, mission, values, strategic positioning

6 Insights Into What Customers Want, . . .

Posted by Tom Smith on Tue, Aug, 12, 2014 @ 10:08 AM

dialog with customers

 

 

 

 

 

 

. . . but companies aren't giving them.

This is taken, and expanded upon, from the book, What Customers Really Want, by Scott McKain.

The book was written in 2005, but many of the lessons are just as today as I have written in a number of blog posts.

Here are the six things customers really want and what most businesses are giving them:

  1. Customers want a compelling experience.  Businesses are giving them customer service, and not very good customer service at that. As Peter Shankman has said, all you have to do to be better than someone else is not "suck."
     
  2. Customers want personal focus.  Business provides a product focus. Sell benefits for the individuals rather than the features the engineers think are cool.
     
  3. Customers want reciprocal loyalty.  Businesses supply endless prospecting.  How much does your company spend on branding, lead generation and demand creation versus customer satisfaction.  If it's less than 80/20, your company is doing better than most.
     
  4. Customers want differentiation.  Businesses offer sameness.  Companies are getting better about offering differentiation within a range.  The ability to custom design your Nike shoes online comes to mind.
     
  5. Customers want coordination.  Businesses offer confusion.  This problem is getting worse rather than better as customers interact with companies across multiple channels when the companies remain siloed in terms of structure and where customer data resides.
     
  6. Customers want innovation.  Businesses want to maintain the status quo.  Apple effectively took online digital music from Sony.  One was innovative, one wanted to maintain the status quo.

Are you more focused on your products and services or on your customers needs and wants?

Do you have an open and ongoing dialog with your customers?

 

Need More Insights From Your Analytics? Download the Free e-book

Tags: consumer insights, transparency, trust, customer experience, dialog

Limiting Online Reviews Inhibits Transparency, Integrity and Insights

Posted by Tom Smith on Thu, Jul, 31, 2014 @ 11:07 AM

Lack of transparency

 

 

 

 

My sister in-law is a frequent traveler who booked a three-day trip to New York to shop and visit museums with a friend of her's from Chicago.

 

She used Expedia to book the six-star Pierre, a Taj Property, and was disappointed and embarrassed by the service she and her friend received.

 

When she tried to post a less than stellar review on Expedia, she was told, "Your hotel review needs revision."

 

This is the gist of what she said:

 

  • The staff was polite but they didn't know what time their restaurants opened.  My friend and I were sent back and forth between the restaurants at the hotel because neither were open with staff telling us they were open when, in fact, they weren't.
     
  • My tea arrived on a pretty tablecloth but the waiter brought French toast which I didn't order.
      
  • The tea pot burned my hand because the handle was metal and had no cover.
     
  • The hair dryer was cheap and burned my hair,
     
  • When I checked out, we asked the porter for our 5 pieces of baggage.   he said "okay", then turned around and started talking to the other staff members.  when we reminded him we had a flight to catch, he went to get the bags, which we could see in the hallway.   It took three staff members to count our bags. How many staff members does it take . . .
     
  • All in all, I chose the hotel expecting first rate service and got just an above averge hotel stay.  I was so disappointed because I thought so highly of the hotel's reputation.
     
  • The location is superb; can't ask for better.

 

"When I told my friends at work about my experience, they said........"maybe that's why you can find that hotel on Expedia."

 

Expedia is not doing themselves, their customers or the Pierre any favors.

 

I saw recently where Four Seasons had just surpassed Ritz Carlton in terms of customer service.

 

If Taj Hotels don't get feedback from disgruntled customers, how are they going to improve.

 

Companies like Expedia are wasting the value of voice of the customer (VOC) feedback by trying to supress less than perfect ratings.

 

I've seen car dealers do this and they're just hurting themselves.

 

Be real, be reliable, and be responsive -- or be gone.

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Tags: consumer insights, transparency, be reliable, be responsive, integrity, be real, VoC, voice of the customer

Your Employees are Key to an Outstanding Customer Experience (#cx)

Posted by Tom Smith on Wed, May, 21, 2014 @ 10:05 AM

engaged employees provide great customer experience

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great presentation by Jim Knight, the former head of Hard Rock Cafe's School of Hard Rocks, at the VOC Fusion (#vocfusion) conference.

 

Jim's presentation was entitled, "How To Achieve Rock Star Status: Employee Culture is the Key to Great Customer Experience."

 

The guest experience is the "top of the iceberg" for the brand.

 

The internal environment (vision, mission, vlues, service philosophy, standards and procedures, tools and processes, beliefs and experiences) are the things beneath the surface that really impact customer experience.

 

There are two types of organizations: virtuous and vicious. Which one is yours?

 

Who you hire determines what kind of organization you are.

 

Hire the wrong employees and you end up with:

  • A disintegrated morale and culture

  • An anemic customer experience

  • No one talking positively about you

  • Slowing visitor rates

  • Missed sales and profit targets

  • Good employees leaving for other jobs

  • Hiring to fill positions rather than making the right hire for the position

 

Virtuous companies focus on hiring the right employees and end up with:

  • Great morale and culture

  • Great customer experiences

  • Raving fans

  • Sales and profits that surpass goals

  • Employees receiving bonuses

  • Potential employees coming to you because your's is a "great place to work"

  •  Hiring the best available people for the job
Jim provided 10 rules for your company to achieve "rock star" status:
  1. The only path to a virtuous environment is through employees. Have a well-defined employee life cycle for all your employees: recruiting, interviewing, selecting, on-boarding, training, communicating, developing, incenting, retaining and separating.

  2. Create compelling, brand-specific recruiting collateral. Have interview standards. Great companies only hire one to two applicants out of every 10 interviews. Hiring the right fit is too important to screw up. Have multiple interviewers use different interview questions and reach consistent on whether or not you're hiring the right person. If not, keep looking.

  3. Implement a rigorous, non-negotiable interviewing process. Keep in mind that today's workforce: values individuality, are virtual learners, have short attention spans, are tech savvy as well as tech dependent, want to do meaningful work. Companies have to think differently about future team members.

  4. Hire rock stars not lipsynchers to amp up the brand. Your employees are your show. The most successful companies in the world have a shared mindset among employees. If you don't tell people they should be working on they fill in the blanks. Individual agendas produce random actions, a culture of confusion and dysfunction.

  5. Be like U2 -- everyone has a part to play in the band. There are stars and there are supporting roles. They are both important. Find the right people for each. Have a sound on-boarding process. It matters how and who teaches new hire orientations. According to the People Report, if another staff member teaches, turnover is 113%. If any manager teaches, turnover is 108%. If a qualified training manager teaches, turnover is 104%. If a general manager teaches, turnover is 98%. The top 10% in sales have the 10% lowest turnover.

  6. Give employees something bigger than themselves to commit to. Communicate with employees in comic book style or airline safety card style -- short, to the point, easy to remember.

  7. Communicate to people in the language in which they dream. Look for learning opportunities outside the classroom. Encourage immediate supervisors to engage with new employees. According to Gallup, the immediate supervisor is the promary reason people leave.

  8. Revolutionize all instructor-led training into "edutainment."

  9. Leadership matters. Leaders have the power to light or extinguish the cultural flame of the company. Leaders bring the flame thrower every day and light it up.

  10. Position your brand to be tatoo-worthy -- for your employees and your customers.

Are your employees more inclined to tatoo your company logo on their body or back in to their parking space so they can get away as soon as their day is over?
As an employer or manager, it is incumbent upon you to hire and empower your employees.
If you want them to be engaged you must inspire them.
What is your vision? What is your mission? What are you doing to inspire your employees?
Empower Employees to Get Insights Download the Free e-book  

 

Tags: emotional connection to the brand, transparency, empower employees, alignment, vision, mission, values

Honesty and Transparency Builds a Stronger Corporate Culture

Posted by Tom Smith on Tue, May, 20, 2014 @ 10:05 AM

Honesty and transparency build a trusting corporate culture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Great article in a recent edition of Fast Company, "At Some Point All of Our Movies Suck," by Ed Catmull, President of Pixar.

 

Catmull starts with the premise that "a hallmark of a great creative culture is that people feel free to share ideas, opinions and criticisms."

 

I would argue that's the hallmark of any great corporate culture.

Be empowered and encouraged to say what's on your mind without fear of reprisal or retribution. Listen intensely to what your employees have to say to earn their trust and to let them know you care about what they have to contribute.

 

"Candor is the key to collaborating effectively. Lack of candor leads to dysfunctional environments."

 

Encourage all employees to share their thoughts, suggestions and concerns. This will make them more empowered and engaged.

 

"The fear of saying something stupid and looking bad, of offending someone or being intimidated, of retaliating or being retaliated against -- they all have a way of reasserting themselves. And when they do you must address them squarely."

 

Following are eight of Ed Catmull's secrets for building a creative business which really apply to all businesses:

  1. Protect creatives from the organization. Empower employees to share their thoughts and ideas.

  2. Cherish your defining moment and then find a new one. What is your vision? What is your mission? Do your employees know and own them?

  3. Save the ugly baby from the hungry beast. Protect ideas that are ill-defined until they have time to mature.

  4. Balance art and commerce. Are you just about making money or do you have a grander vision?

  5. How the Disney braintrust grew up. Trust is an something you actually have to screw up together and then realize the mistakes actually didn't kill anybody.

  6. Things are always going to go wrong and you can't see them. Learn from them.

  7. Real risk means real failures. Learn to live with the risk of failure and have the confidence to know you can bounce back from it.

  8. Your best tool is a genius or a disaster. Empower your people to do their best and they will.

 

"Seek out people who are willing to level with you, and when you find them, hold them close."

 

Are your employees empowered or afraid to speak up?

 

Empower them to speak up. Your company, and your customers, will benefit.

 

Empower Employees to Get Insights Download the Free e-book  

 

Tags: transparency, trust, empower employees, honesty